Adorable Yelling Parrot Birb Memes Funny Trex Cockatiel T-Shirts & Hoodies|Teeracer

Last upgraded: March 11, 2020. If you do not like “Adorable Screaming Parrot Birb Memes Funny Trex Cockatiel “, yplease utilize the Browse Bar on the top right corner to find the best one for you. Simply type the keyword and hit: Movie, Music, TV Program, Life Design, Funny, Jobs, Pets, Outdoor, Drinking … Choose from over 10 million distinct tees, has a big choice of shirt styles.Cute Screaming Parrot Birb Memes Funny Trex Cockatiel Shirt.

Birb.

Hello, Apexians! It’s Monday, and we have money stories for you. Are you ready to dive into some of the best personal-finance articles from around the web? I am!

A midwife in the North Country. [The New Yorker] — “Sunday Smith is likely the only certified nurse-midwife offering out-of-hospital births in a hundred-mile radius. Her services are in high demand, yet she has trouble making ends meet.” This is a l-o-n-g article (and it may be behind a paywall for you) but it’s fascinating. It touches on many different aspects of personal finance. Well worth reading, if you have the time.

Five lessons from the “witch” of Wall Street. [Morningstar] — “During the Gilded Age of the late 19th century, a woman named Hetty Green was one of the most powerful financiers in the world. She made the vast majority of her $100 million fortune ($2.3 billion in today’s dollars) herself, investing in railroad stocks and bonds, government bonds, and mining stocks. She also provided loans to cash-strapped businesses and bailed out the city of New York on several occasions…Here are five lessons we can learn from Hetty Green about investing and life.”

The aggregation of marginal gains. [Josh Overmyer] — “The guys on the ChooseFI podcast talk about it all the time, how life doesn’t just suddenly become wonderful overnight. Each and every small change or improvement we make adds up and compounds over a lifetime. And because of the power of the Aggregation of Marginal Gains, Brad posts a prompt every Friday morning asking ‘What was the ONE THING you did this week to make your life easier, happier, wealthier, more efficient, etc?’ I’ve gone back to almost every week in 2019 to gather what I posted on each of the Friday Facebook prompts from Brad. Here’s a look back.”

It’s time to let go of commuter culture. [Jalopnik] — “Cities across the world are re-examining the role of the automobile. More specifically, and especially among American cities, they’re trying to get more people to commute like Leo. This is happening because, in many cases, policymakers have realized that they cannot continue to grow by adding more people who use cars as their sole transportation method, to say nothing of mitigating the never-ending gridlock and poor air quality that exists today.”

To wrap things up this Monday, here’s a very important non-financial article from Audobon: When is a bird a “birb”? — “Birb is a slightly daffy word from the same school of internet absurdity that gave us LOLCats and Doge. Yet unlike these online gags, or memes, birb functions as a category rather than a stock character. It is roughly akin to ‘doggo’ or ‘snek’, yet all dogs and snakes are contained within those words; birb remains amorphous.”

Jim and I are here to help you with all of life’s important matters. 😉

The post Birb. appeared first on Apex Money.

Birb-friends – Chapter 7, Act 4, Strip 49

When you need a deus-ex-machina in a fantasy setting, eagles are a time-honored choice, if not often employed today. Professor Tolkien himself introduced them to this function, after all, although he remarked that they should be used sparingly, and not too soon in a story. Following his advice, I’ve delayed their appearance to the final act, and only used them in the most sparing way possible – as a mere decoy.

At least the Professorian can take comfort in the fact that he didn’t, technically, lie. The eagles were coming. He didn’t say that they were going to do anything in particular…you might say that that was implied in his statement, but he didn’t say it as such, and thus wasn’t lying.

He still got everybody to look up, which was the point of the exercise…and which is quite an achievement for a paper fold-up figure. These poor Orcs and Trolls will definitely have creases on the back of their necks now, that’s no joking matter with such paper-thin physiques.

The rest of the teams’ actions would certainly not have met with Professor Tolkien’s approval, though. Breaking and running doesn’t really meet his exacting standard of literary heroism. But for our friends, it’s a time-honoured tactic…as is the whole look behind you! distraction maneuvre (although it’s more conventionally played with a three-headed monkey involved). They feel that they still can be heroes, even employing such tactics, as long as they manage to defeat the bad guys in the end.

Which seems far from likely at the moment, but not quite as impossible as it would have been if they were dead right now.

Birds that Deserve the Honorific “Birb”

Photo: Tara Tanaka/Audubon Photography Awards
A Northern Parula like this definitely qualifies for the affectionate label “birb.” In fact, in its fluffed-up form, it also fits the birb subcategory “floof.” (All in fun.)

You can discover some entertaining things on twitter, especially when someone you follow retweets an unusual item from someone else. I keep tabs on a lot of nature lovers, and that’s how I learned about birbs.

Asher Elbein writes at Audubon magazine that because birbs have been an internet meme for seven years (who knew?), “it’s high time we establish some ground rules. …

“For those not terminally online, birb is affectionate internet-speak for birds. The word began, as near as anyone can tell, when the absurdist Twitter account BirdsRightsActivist tweeted the single word ‘Birb’ out on November 2012. … The term is seemingly designed for the internet: one syllable, beginning and ending with ‘b,’ connoting a pleasant roundness, a warm mouth-feel. ‘What a good birb,’ you might say, or ‘I’m so glad we went birb-watching,’ or ‘I love Alfred Hitchcock’s The Birbs.’

“Birb is a slightly daffy word from the same school of internet absurdity that gave us LOLCats (‘I Can Haz Cheezburger’). … Yet unlike these online gags, or memes, birb functions as a category rather than a stock character. It is roughly akin to ‘doggo,’ or ‘snek,’ yet all dogs and snakes are contained within those words; birb remains amorphous. … Are some birds more birb-like than others? What is a birb, really?

“First, let’s consider the canonized usages. The subreddit r/birbs defines a birb as any bird that’s ‘being funny, cute, or silly in some way.’ Urban Dictionary has a more varied set of definitions, many of which allude to a generalized smallness. …

“What this question requires, therefore, are some basic operational rules.

“Rule 1: Birbs are often (though not conclusively) small. Adult Ostriches are thus disqualified, as is any bird larger than a turkey; warblers, sparrows, flycatchers, and other songbirds are the most likely demographic. Even large birds start small, however: An ostrich or crane chick is absolutely a birb. We may understand, then, that while ‘birb’ can be a developmental stage, some birds are birbs their whole lives.

“Rule 2: Birbs are often (though not always) round. People tend to regard round animals as cuter, and round objects in general to be more pleasant. … Classic songbirds and rotund groundbirds like grouse and ptarmigans have the advantage: They look like little balls of fluff, an important component for birbness. … If the Pileated Woodpecker didn’t lose its birb status under Rule 1, it does now, though smaller and rounder woodpeckers like the Downy or Red-bellied are most certainly birbs.

“Rule 3: Birbs appear cute. This gets into slightly dicier territory: Isn’t cuteness subjective? Up to a point, but Rule 2 helps here. Humans tend to like looking at round and fluffy things. So much so, in fact, that violent or unseemly behavior doesn’t disqualify a bird from birbness: the aggression of hummingbirds, the Vlad-the-impaler antics of shrikes, brood parasitism of cuckoos, and brain-eating of Great Tits are immaterial to their round fluffiness. You could post a picture of any of these on reddit under ‘murder birb’ and nobody would blink. … Silliness and absurdity also come into play: The potoo bird is large and not particularly fluffy, but its general muppety appearance makes it a contender for the title. …

“The following can be unquestionably judged as birbs, hitting the natural sweet spot of round, fluffy, and small: The vast majority of songbirds. Burrowing Owls, Elf Owls, both screech-owls, American Kestrels, and other small raptors also qualify. So do prairie chickens, quail, shorebirds like sandpipers, and smaller seabirds like puffins and penguins. … Little waders like the Green Heron are in, but the Great Blue Heron? Sorry, not a birb.

“Big raptors, while incredible and fascinating creatures, are not birbs. … Most cranes, herons, and storks are too large and lanky. And then you get to birds like the Cassowary, which is perhaps the least birb-like bird on the planet. Its chicks may qualify as birbs (see Rule 1), but the adults most definitely do not.

“Now, one might reasonably ask why it matters which birds qualify as birbs. Strictly speaking, of course, it doesn’t. But viewed sidelong, it becomes a taxonomic game, akin to ‘is a hot dog a sandwich?’ ”

Which, you have to admit, is one of the more urgent questions of our time.

Photo: Honest to Paws
The Muppet-like goofiness of the Great Potoo allows it to qualify as a birb.

When Is a Bird a ‘Birb’? An Extremely Important Guide

There are certain terms that embed themselves into your consciousness like a woodpecker’s beak in particle board. “Birb” is one of them. For those not terminally online, birb is affectionate internet-speak for birds. The word began, as near as anyone can tell, when the absurdist Twitter account BirdRightsActivist tweeted the single word “Birb,” out on November 2012; two years later, it had multiple entries in Urban Dictionary and a dedicated reddit forum. The term is seemingly designed for the internet: one syllable, beginning and ending with “b,” connoting a pleasant roundness, a warm mouth-feel. What a good birb, you might say, or I’m so glad we went birb-watching, or I love Alfred Hitchcock’s The Birbs.

Birb is a slightly daffy word from the same school of internet absurdity that gave us LOLCats (“I Can Has Cheezburger”) and Doge (“Much Meme, very cute. Wow.”) Yet unlike these online gags, or memes, birb functions as a category rather than a stock character. It is roughly akin to “doggo,” or “,” yet all dogs and snakes are contained within those words; birb remains amorphous. Sit outside an Austin coffeeshop on a pleasant fall day, and many urban birds present themselves for perusal: strutting, sardonic grackles, chatty parakeets, bustling sparrows. Which of them are birb? Are some birds more birb-like than others? What is a birb, really?

First, let’s consider the canonized usages. The subreddit r/birbs defines a birb as any bird that’s “being funny, cute, or silly in some way.” Urban Dictionary has a more varied set of definitions, many of which allude to a generalized smallness. A video on the youtube channel Lucidchart offers its own expansive suggestions: All birds are birbs, a chunky bird is a borb, and a fluffed-up bird is a floof. Yet some tension remains: How can all birds be birbs if smallness or cuteness are in the equation? Clearly some birds get more recognition for an innate birbness.

What this question requires, therefore, are some basic operational rules. 

Northern Parula (floof). Photo: Tara Tanaka/Audubon Photography Awards

Rule 1: Birbs are often (though not conclusively) small. Adult Ostriches are thus disqualified, as is any bird larger than a turkey; warblers, sparrows, flycatchers, and other songbirds are the most likely demographic. Even large birds start small, however: An ostrich or crane chick is absolutely a birb. We may understand, then, that while “birb” can be a developmental stage, some birds are birbs their whole lives. 

Rule 2: Birbs are often (though not always) round. People tend to regard round animals as cuter, and round objects in general to be more pleasant. (This shape factor also complements the aforementioned roundness of the word “birb” itself.) Given this, the rounder or fluffier a bird is, the more birblike it is likely to be. Here again, classic songbirds and rotund groundbirds like grouse and ptarmigans have the advantage: They look like little balls of fluff, an important component for birbness. Most hawks and eagles are too sharp and angular to qualify under this metric; the same goes for many gulls, cranes, crows, and grackles. If the Pileated Woodpecker didn’t lose its birb status under Rule 1, it does now, though smaller and rounder woodpeckers like the Downy or Red-bellied are most certainly birbs. 

Dark-eyed Junco (birb). Photo: Michele Black/Great Backyard Bird Count

Rule 3: Birbs appear cute.This gets into slightly dicier territory: Isn’t cuteness subjective? Up to a point, but Rule 2 helps here: Humans tend to like looking at round and fluffy things. So much so, in fact, that violent or unseemly behavior doesn’t disqualify a bird from birbness: the aggression of hummingbirds, the Vlad-the-impaler antics of shrikes, brood parasitism of cuckoos, and brain-eating of Great Tits are immaterial to their round fluffiness. You could post a picture of any of these on reddit under “murder birb” and nobody would blink. Again, eagles and other large raptors are a bit too majestic and fierce looking to count under this metric. However, silliness or absurdity also come into play: The potoo bird is large and not particularly fluffy, but its general muppety appearance makes it a contender for the title. 

Now that we’ve laid out some basic guidelines, let’s test them out. The following can be unquestionably judged as birbs, hitting the natural sweet spot of round, fluffy, and small: The vast majority of songbirds. Burrowing Owls, Elf Owls, both screech-owls, American Kestrals, and other small raptors also qualify. So do prairie chickens, quail, shorebirds like sandpipers, and smaller seabirds like puffins and penguins. Parrots of all sizes are in, despite some of them being quite formidable, because culturally they scan as cute. Little waders like the Green Heron are in, but the Great Blue Heron? Sorry, not a birb.

Shoebill (not birb). Photo: John Rollins/Audubon Photography Awards

As discussed, big raptors, while incredible and fascinating creatures, are not birbs. The same goes for large seabirds like gulls and albatrosses. Swans and geese have solidified a reputation as terrors, and are worryingly big besides. Most cranes, herons, and storks are too larger and lanky. And then you get to birds like the Shoebill stork and the Cassowary, which are perhaps the least birb-like birds on the planet. Their chicks may qualify as birbs (see Rule 1), but the adults most definitely do not.

Now, one might reasonably ask why it matters which birds qualify as birbs. Strictly speaking, of course, it doesn’t. But viewed sidelong, it becomes a taxonomic game, akin to “is a hot dog a sandwich.” These sorts of debates are fun partially because they reveal real fault-lines in our operational definitions. It’s a chance to take stock, not just of what we think about birds, but how we think about them. Defining “birb” also means interrogating our impressions. It’s not only about rating them: It’s about reminding us that—regardless of birb-status—all birds are good.

How to Make Flappy Birb With Block Editor: 9 Steps

From here the steps get hard. Always check back on the picture to make sure you’re doing it right.

First we need three new variables. “ticks”, “emptyObstacleY” and “index2”.

Take an If block from the Logic section. This is where everything will go inside.

Inside Logic, under comparisons , take a “0=0” block.

From Math, take a remainder block.

For the first number, we put in the variable ticks.

The for the second value put a 3.

Then put this newly finished block into the first number value of the 0=0 block turning it into ” Remainder of ticks divided by 3 = 0.

Then take this block and put it in the If block instead of true. Then it should say ” If remainder of ticks divide by 3 = 0 then”

Now we can put things in the block.

From Variables. Take the set block

Make it ” Set emptyObstacleY”

Then from Math, take the pick random block and set the values to “pick random form 0 to 4”

then put this pick random block into your set emptyObstacleY block. Refer to the picture to see if you did it right.

Put this set block under and inside the larger If block.

Now from Loops, take the third block there, For (Variable) from 0 to 4 do.

For the variable, insert “index2”

It should now be, For index2 from 0 to 4 do.

Now put this under and in the larger If block.

Now take another If block and put it in the for block.

Now from the Logic, subsection Comparison, take another if 0=0 block but change it to if 0 does not equal 0.

Replace the first 0 with variable index2

Replace the other variable with emptyObstacleY

Now take this block and put it instead of true.

Now from Arrays, take the add value to end block.

Make the first variable obstacles.

Now in the blank we put a create sprite at x,y block.

X will be 4 and Y will be variable index 2

Now put this Array block in the smaller If block which is in the For block.